Featuring: Roger Bootle

Roger Bootle

One of the City of London’s best-known economists, Roger Bootle runs the consultancy, Capital Economics, which specialises in macroeconomics and the economics of the property market. He is also a Specialist Adviser to the House of Commons Treasury Committee and an Honorary Fellow of the Institute of Actuaries.


This article was originally published in Capital Economics July 5, 2012 Special Report. Summary of the winning entry A team from Capital Economics, led by Roger Bootle, has won the Wolfson Economics Prize 2012. The Prize, which is the second-biggest award to an economist after the Nobel Prize, sought to find the best answer to […]

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This excerpt, which defines outright deflation, was originally published in Roger Bootle’s book, The Death of Inflation — Surviving & Thriving in the Zero Era, pages 15-16, London: Nicholas Brealy Publishing Ltd, 1996. I said above that one of the apparent advantages of a regime of steadily falling prices is that there could be greater […]

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This excerpt was originally published in Roger Bootle’s The Death of Inflation — Surviving & Thriving in the Zero Era, pages 2-5, London: Nicholas Brealey Publishing Ltd, 1996. Imagine a world without perpetual inflation: prices in the shops falling in some years, rising in others; pay rising by 2 or 3% in the good years, […]

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This excerpt was originally published in The Trouble With Markets – Saving Capitalism From Itself, pages 60-64, London: Nicholas Brealey Publishing Ltd, 2009. The deflation danger So, in a nutshell, despite the widespread alarm about the inflationary danger, in today’s conditions I reckon that deflation is a more likely threat to stability than inflation. In […]

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This excerpt was originally published in Roger Bootle’s book, The Death of Inflation — Surviving & Thriving in the Zero Era, pages 9-12, London: Nicholas Brealey Publishing Ltd, 1996. At the moment, price deflation is far from the intentions of policy-makers. But, of course, what they intend and aim for is one thing; what actually […]

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This excerpt was originally published in Money For Nothing, pages 71-99, London: Nicholas Brealey Publishing Ltd, 2003. On the eve of the Great Crash any investors who had been worried by the musings of Roger W. Babson had received considerable reassurance from an altogether more distinguished source, Irving Fisher: mathematician, inventor, eugenicst, heath enthusiast, crusader, […]

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