Originally published by Nikkei Asian Review on July 12, 2018

As we’ve noted in these pages, consumer spending in Japan continues to languish. Indeed, Japan’s Wal-Mart unit barely broke even as of the fiscal year ending December 2017, and now, the retail giant is heading for the exit. You can get details from this July 12 Nikkei Asian Review article excerpt: Walmart is withdrawing from […]

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Originally published by Reuters on July 5, 2018 Read the original article.

That’s the headline from a July 5 Reuters article. This excerpt from the article provides details: Japan’s household spending tumbled in May at the fastest pace in almost two years, but real wages rose even more quickly – a possible boost to Japan’s long campaign to change consumers’ deflationary expectations. Some economists warn this pace […]

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Originally published by FX Street on June 25, 2018 Read the original article.

Elliott Wave International has been keeping subscribers updated on signs of a developing deflationary trend. Just focusing on one example, the November 2016 Elliott Wave Financial Forecast noted: The movie business broke lower, as the autumn box office (September 8 to October 18) fell 16% from record levels a year ago. Since then, tough times […]

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Originally published by CNBC on June 24, 2018 Read the original article.

The desire to hoard cash is a classic trait of a deflationary psychology. And, in Japan, this has been evident for quite some time. EWI has been keeping subscribers ahead of this trend. For example, the September 2016 Elliott Wave Financial Forecast remarked: Earlier this year we reported on a run on safes in Japan, […]

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Originally published by Xinhua News Agency on June 12, 2018 Read the original article.

Anyone who has scanned the financial media in recent months has seen that the Fed is aiming to keep inflation under control. The prospects of deflation has all but disappeared from the central bank’s radar screen. But, in the view of Elliott Wave International, preparations should be made for deflation, not inflation. Yes, the economy […]

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Originally published by Asia Times on June 10, 2018 Read the original article.

Robert Prechter’s book, Conquer the Crash, states: The psychological aspect of deflation … cannot be overstated. … As consumers become more conservative, they save more and spend less. These behaviors reduce the “velocity” of money, i.e., the speed with which it circulates to makes purchases, thus putting downside pressure on prices. The above encapsulates what’s […]

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